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Kale Chips

Today I am back in the kitchen after a four day trip to Monterey, California to see my nephew. I really enjoyed the redwoods in the hills above Santa Cruz, and the beach too. where he took us. It was great to bask in 75 degree weather before coming home to a high of 30 degrees with winds up to forty miles an hour. I believe it’s about the coldest day this winter when you figure in the chill factor. Where oh where is Spring?

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I have been super busy all day but found time on my trip to the bank and post office to get groceries for a couple of projects I had in mind. I wanted to bake more kale chips even though it’s not a typical fast and furious recipe. The secret is to do kale chips when you are hanging out by the oven to turn the chips halfway. The most work is cleaning and seasoning the chips which took me about 15 minutes. After that it was 30 minutes in the oven and now I have great tasting kale chips for the next few days unless they are munched in one session of mad munchies fever!

 

As for the recipe it is simple. Wash, dry and cut into chip size pieces. Drizzle about a tablespoon or two of olive oil on the chips that are spread out on a sheet pan. Sprinkle your favorite seasoning salt, or plain salt on them. Grind some fresh pepper on them, or use something fun like red pepper, or jalapeno powder. Toss them around in the pan almost like tossing a salad to distribute the oil, salt and pepper. You can even rub in the oil a bit while tossing. Pop in the oven at 300 degrees.

 

green and gorgeous kale

green and gorgeous kale

Turn the chips and arrange so they are not touching after 15 minutes in the oven. Rotate the pans at this point. Turn heat down to 250 degrees and cook until crisp(about 15-20 minutes) then remove from oven to cool. Now you have great tasting, healthy kale chips for lunches and snacks. They go great with red wine!

Hello Kitty timer says "15 minutes, then turn the chips"

Hello Kitty timer says “15 minutes, then turn the chips”

So give slow food a try if it fits your schedule, it’s worth it once in a while.

snack time

snack time

 

Pan Toasted Spicy Croutons

Farm Visits

It’s been a busy week here a the fast and furious test kitchen with lots of great things from my favorite farms. I’ve been getting the tastiest farm fresh lima beans ever from K.P. Huber’s Farm in Kingsville, MD. These are the best looking and best tasting lima beans I have ever bought! At $3 per quart sized basket they are a deal.

 

Just up the road at Wilbur’s Farm I’m getting great organic produce that my garden doesn’t have, or is struggling with. They have the sweetest white corn I have ever tasted, and everything they sell is certified organic. I like their potatoes, onions, green beans, eggplant, and zucchini. I just made a lovely ratatouille last night from their zucs, and eggplant and my tomatoes. Good stuff indeed. If you have not tried making ratatouille you should. It’s good hot the night you make it and if not overcooked it’s quite good at room temperature for leftovers. It stays fresh for several days after cooking too.

 

Tuesday was a big day for me as I was able to drive down to Polyface Farm in Swoope, Virginia. There I walked the farm to see if what I have read is true about Joel Salatin turning the farm world on its head by developing sustainable methods of raising cows, pigs, chickens, rabbits and more on his 450 acre family farm. It seems all true, and I witnessed happy cows in a beautiful pasture, and happy pigs in the woods about a mile up the hill from the farm house.

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I bought a chicken from the farm store to test in the FFC test kitchen tonight and tomorrow night. Tonight it’s a French style roasted half chicken with fresh garlic and dried rosemary. Tomorrow night it’s Filipino Chicken Adobo. Come September 16th I’ll visit the farm again to be guest chef for Joel’s family, the farm workers and apprentices for dinner. That night I plan to cook the same two chicken dishes for all 21 people on the farm. Lucky for me the cook, Brie, will be helping me in the kitchen.

 

With all the great tomatoes my garden has been putting out I decided to buy some salad greens to pair with them. Last week I had some leftover bread from our supper club dinner and decided to turn it into fresh croutons. These are better than store bought by far, and almost as addictive a Doritos for munching. It does help if you use good bread like a whole grain loaf, or even ciabatta works well. I made another batch today and took a sample across the street for Wendy and Mary at Moore’s Orchard to taste and both of them liked the croutons a lot. Therefore I share with you now another fast and furious cook original recipe to try in your kitchen. This will take about 15 minutes to make , and lasts for 2-3 days if you don’t eat them all the day they are made.

As always, please try the recipe and comment on my blog.

 

Pan Toasted Spicy Croutons

2 1/2 cups day old bread cut into 1/2 inch cubes

4 teaspoons garlic infused olive oil

3/4 teaspoon of dried oregano, or mixed italian herbs

1/2 teaspoon red chili flakes or fresh thai peppers sliced thin

optional, 1/4 teaspoon salt

optional, 1/4 teaspoon paprika

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Add oil to saute pan and heat on medium low for 10 seconds or so.

Add the bread and toss well to distribute the oil on the bread cubes.

Continue cooking on medium to medium low for 5-7 minutes tossing or stirring every minute or two.

Add oregano, and chili and cook for two minutes on low heat.

 

 

IMG_4862By now they should be done, but test one to see if it is a crunchy as you want them. If you want them crunchier just cook another 2-4 minutes on low and that should do the trick.

Remove from saute pan to a sheet pan to cool for 3-5 minutes before adding to a salad.

Note:

Use regular olive oil in place of garlic infused and add 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder with the chili and oregano.

finely shredded parmesan cheese is a nice addition at the end. Just add after the heat is off and toss or stir well to distribute the cheese.

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Great with soups or salad.

Cooks best if your saute pan is big enough to keep the bread cubes at just one layer. If the pan is too small the cubes will stack up and won’t brown properly.

 

Peach Daquiri Time

One of the best parts of moving to our home in North Baltimore almost three years ago was being across the street from a 150 year old peach orchard(Moore’s Orchard). Each summer around the Fourth of July the peaches are ready for us lucky consumers. When the first peaches become available one has to be vigilant, because instead of the usual sandwich board sign advertising said peaches on busy Joppa Road there is a less visible sign that goes up on the less busy Peach Blossom Road. This is because there aren’t a lot of early peaches to be had and the rush of buyers would wipe out the store in no time at all.

 

This year I was looking most every day from the first of July on and was thrilled when I spied the sign pronouncing the beginning of the season on July 5th. These first peach varieties are small but very juicy and tasty indeed. I promptly bought two $5 bags of each type (yellow and white), and took them home to wash them up and test. Even though they were only the size of a tennis ball they packed big flavor.

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Way back in 1979 I lived in the small mountain town of Frisco, Colorado amongst an assortment of old hippies, ski bums, old timer locals, and people fleeing the boredom of the plains states. They were an interesting colorful bunch indeed. It was there on a warm summer’s day two of my new found friends invited me across the street from the Moose Jaw to partake in a party with daiquiris made from scratch. It was there that I learned the right way to make a daquiri with fresh lime juice and honey instead of sweet and sour mix. Sure you could use the sweet and sour mixes sold in liquor stores to whip up one of these frozen drink delights, but once you taste this method you will never again want that sweet and sour chemical crap in your daiquiri again.

 

It was at this party that we indulged in peach daiquiris and strawberry daiquiris until the perfect mix was obtained. Sure it was tough duty testing batch after batch, but we were young and full of ambition. The end result other than getting our daily requirement of fruit for the week was all of us agreed this was the way to make a frozen daiquiri hence forth. Therefore I will now share with you the magic recipe for the best frozen daiquiri you will probably ever taste.

 

I have made some changes in the recipe, actually just one change. For sweetener I had previously used honey, but it was always difficult to get it to blend into a frozen drink properly. Now I use Agave Nectar that the good folks at Sugar in the Raw gifted me at Eat, Write, Retreat food bloggers meeting in Philadelphia last month. Agave Nectar dissolves much better than honey and works as well or better in this drink. Rum is optional if you don’t drink alcohol.

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Frozen Peach Daquiris

2 cups peeled and sliced fresh juicy peaches

2 to 2 ½ cups crushed ice

1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice

1 tablespoon agave nectar

4 ounces rum

 

In a capable blender add the peaches first, then the ice, lime, agave and rum. Blend until all ingredients are pureed. This will vary depending on your blender and size of crushed ice. Top with a slice of fresh peach and enjoy. Repeat if hot and thirsty.

Serves 2-4.

 

Note:

Strawberries work well with this recipe too.

You can use frozen peaches or strawberries with half the ice and enough water to make it all blend properly.

My new Osterizer classic beehive blender that I just bought worked great!

Even though I was gifted Agave Nectar from Sugar in the Raw the ideas and recipe expressed are my own.

 

 

Some Like It Hot!

My love affair with hot spicy foods began when I was a teenager eating chips and salsa in a real Mexican Restaurant in Alamosa, Colorado. I would dip the chip just enough to get a kick but not go to the painful levels of the Scoville scale. Heck, I hadn’t even heard of the Scoville scale invented by Wilbur Scoville to measure the hotness of peppers back in 1912 until I’d been eating hot peppers for 20 years or so. Over the years I kept upping the heat and trying new types of ethnic foods that incorporate peppers to expand my pepper experience.

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Since then I have used the scale many times over the last 15 years to look up the heat ratings of my favorite peppers. It seems the more new and different hot pepper varieties I try, the more I love hot peppers. They taste great and contrary to public opinion they are good for you! I think I could devote a whole month to hot pepper folklore, recipes and new recipe research on my blog. The most important thing about cooking with, growing and eating hot peppers is they must taste good! I don’t care how hot it is if I don’t like the taste.

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It’s kind of funny that I would plant habeneros in my first garden project here in our backyard in Baltimore, Maryland since I had not really liked them much up to that point in my life. I thought I would plant them and see what might happen when I saw a six pack of small plants for $2.50, and was blessed with one crazy little bush out of athat Habenero six pack that gave me more than a hundred peppers! Not wanting to waste the beautiful peppers I set to work to find a way to eat them, and discovered a delicious home made Habenero Salsa (http://www.fastandfuriouscook.com/habanero-salsa/).

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You can cook down a whole bunch of Habeneros into a couple of half pint jars and store them for a long time if you do the canning process correctly. After that first year’s success I was hooked on growing and eating Habeneros and bought a few Caribbean Red Habeneros to plant as well as the yellow variety. They did ok in the garden and I used them for many a stir fry and also made hot sauce from them. What an amazing flavor they have. They aren’t quite as pungent as a regular yellow Habenero, and not scorching hot like a Ghost Pepper. Red Habeneros have an exotic flavor that conjures up visions of hanging out under an umbrella stretched out on a lounge chair at a Caribbean beach with a cold beer and a nice breeze.

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For most people one or two drops of my red salsa on a tortilla chip is enough and gives a flavor explosion as well as raise the internal temperature of the mouth. Last year when my in-laws and my nephew were visiting for Thanksgiving I held a taste test with three kinds of salsas I had made from the summer’s pepper crop. Everyone picked the Caribbean Red as there favorite. It’s not super hot, only 120,000 to 400,000 on the Scoville Scale, and goes well with many different types of food.

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You can put it in a meat marinade, stir fry recipe, salad dressing, tomato salsa, or put one in a jar of pickles. Next time you are in your favorite grocery store ask if they carry Red Habeneros. I was surprised to find them in two different grocery stores in my area recently, and of course I had to buy them. I had just ran out of my home made red salsa from last year and needed to make a new batch. Today was the day and I happy to say it came out good and hot. Just remember to handle with care as they are hot! I use plastic food handler’s gloves or even dishwashing gloves when I prep these little fire bombs.

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Red Habenero Salsa

1 1/4 cup Red Habeneros sliced thin

1 cup yellow onion sliced thin

1 cup red bell pepper sliced thin

1 clove garlic minced, about 1 Tablespoon

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

Water to cover

2-4 tablespoons Bragg’s or Spectrum Apple Cider Vinegar

 

In a  1 1/2 quart pot saute the onions, bell peppers and garlic for 3-5 minutes on medium heat stirring often. Once the onions, bell peppers and garlic are softened add the habeneros and water to cover. Cook on medium low to medium maintaining a simmer for 20-25 minutes stirring about every 5 minutes until all but about a half cup of the water is cooked off. Cool for 5 minutes and blend well in a food processor adding vinegar until desired twang id achieved. I like the lesser amount of vinegar, but if you want a Tabasco sauce like twang you will probably want to use the larger amount of vinegar. I have kept this type of sauce fresh in my refrigerator for up to 6 months. It lasts a long time as a little goes a long way. Be sure and gift some to your friends and family who like it hot!

 

Note:

You can drain off most of the liquid after cooking/cooling before blending and add it back  bit by bit to get your desired consistency.

My 93 year old Aunt Jule’s Corn Muffins

I am blessed with an aunt who has survived 93 years on this planet, and teaches me much about the world. She is in excellent health due in part to her eating habits. When I visit her in Fairhope, Alabama I ask questions pertaining to her longevity and good health. I consider her in excellent health because she can see well, hear well, walk well, drive a car somewhat well, and can eat well. She is in a state of health I aspire to be in at that age should I be so lucky. Here are some of the things she has told me about living healthy. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables every day, preferably organic. Walk most every day,(she has a dog that she got partly to get her out of the house for walks every day when she might not be otherwise motivated).

Attitude is everything. My aunt has not had a cushy life. Her first husband was weird and harsh. She divorced him back in the 1950’s and then carved out a career in social work, leaving geology behind. Her second significant other committed suicide shortly after having a stroke in 1997. She has weathered it all with grace and humility.

One of the aspects of her life that keeps her young and active is her social network of fellow writers, singers, church members, and neighbors. She plays the drums in a local band. She is a published author and, meets weekly with a local writers group. She belongs to a local improv group that meets just to have a good time, not to perform for the public. She quit her singing group because she was just too darn busy!

She is an inspiration to me on how to retire, and live well. Even though she doesn’t have much money she lives a richer life that most people I have ever met. I treasure each chance I get to fly down to Alabama and hang out with her for a couple of days for more life lessons, and stories. On this trip she has shared with me her recipe for Gluten-free Cornbread Muffins that we ate with a bit of omega-3 enhanced butter substitute spread this morning. If you are looking for a gluten-free muffin recipe, or just a good cornbread muffin recipe try this one. Who knows you might make it to 93 also if you eat these.

 

Aunt Jule’s Gluten Free Corn Muffins

1 cup Hodgson Mill stone ground flour

1 cup Uncle Bob’s gluten-free oat flour

1/2 cup rice flour

1/2 teaspoon of salt

2 1/2 teaspoons Clabber Girl Baking Powder

1 1/4 cup milk

2 eggs

3 tablespoons canola oil

 

Mix dry ingredients

In a separate bowl whisk eggs and oil, then add milk.

Add wet ingredients to dry and mix just until blended.

Drop by tablespoon in muffin cups, and bake in a 450 degree oven for 18 minutes or until lightly browned.

Makes 12

 

Dinner at my Aunt's home

Dinner at my Aunt’s home

Garlic Infused Olive Oil/ Roasted Garlic

This item is used in so many things I prepare in my kitchen that I have it in the fridge most of the year. Very easy to make and so useful. You will never need to buy garlic infused oil again. It lasts about two weeks in the fridge, and the cloves are great tossed with pasta.

1 cup olive oil

1 bulb of garlic, smaller cloves are better than big ones

 

Cut ends off of garlic cloves and take all skin off before cooking on low heat for about 6-8 minutes. Use a saute pan that is small enough for 1 cup of oil to cover cloves. Garlic will have air bubbles coming off the cloves like champagne bubbles. Do not let the cloves turn brown while cooking. Remove from heat and let cool. Oil and cloves will stay fresh in a covered jar for two weeks or more in the refrigerator. This has many uses as an oil or for the cooked cloves. I like the cloves in hummus, pasta or pizza. I use the oil for sauteing or dipping bread in.

 

Easy Italian Salad Dressing

2/3 cup oil, either olive oil or salad oil
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar, either Spectrum or Braggs
1 teaspoon dried Italian herbs
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic or shallots, optional

Mix dried herbs with vinegar. Add garlic or shallots if using and mix well. Add oil, mix well. Can be used right away, but gets better after being refrigerated for a day.

Bosnian Bread

Bosnian Bread5 cups of all purpose flour
1 cup of whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon yeast
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
3 to 3 1/3 cups water. Varies due to reletive humidity, types and brands of flour etc.

Dissolve yeast and sugar in 1 cup of warm water. Let stand for 5 minutes. Mix flours and salt together in a mixing bowl. Mix all ingredients for 8-10 minutes. I use a Kitchen Aid stand mixer for 8 minutes on slow speed, and 2 minutes on medium speed. Put into large oiled bowl and let rise for 2 hours. Punch down dough and let rest for 5 minutes before kneading. Knead for 3-5 minutes by hand adding flour to keep it from sticking to counter top. Put into oiled baking sheet or cut in half and put in loaf pans. Let rise until doubled in size. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 45-50 minutes.

Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal


1 3/4 cups water
1/4 cup apple juice
1-2 teaspoons honey
2/3 cups steel cut oatmeal
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
3 tablespoons canned pumpkin

Bring water to a boil, apple juice and add oats and spices. Cook simmering for 12 minutes. Add canned pumpkin and honey, Cook for 2-5 more minutes depending on how dry you like it.

Optional: Top with a shot of canned whip cream.
serves two

Kurt’s Killer Salsa

20 medium size fresh tomatoes diced, (13 cups diced)
1/2 yellow onion diced
3 cloves fresh garlic minced
3 teaspoons salt
10 fresh jalapenos diced, 5 or less if you want it milder
1 Tablespoon dried oregano

Combine all ingredients and simmer for 45 minutes uncovered.
Add 2 Tablespoons of lemon juice if you are canning the salsa.
makes about 7 pints

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Did you ever come home from work or a busy day and thought you didn’t have time to cook a healthy great tasting meal? Many of us have this problem, but there is a way to conquer that beast. You just need the recipes, basic supplies and support of this blog to get you through it. I have learned over the last twenty years how to create great, healthy meals in very little time. You don’t need to be a chef to make this work for you. I have done the hard work of developing a plan for you.
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